Everything you need to know about securing an Arkansas oversized permit

Arkansas is home to six national park sites, 2.5 million acres of national forests, seven national scenic byways, three state scenic byways and 50 state parks. But to drive an oversized load through The Natural State, you’ll need to secure an Arkansas oversized permit. At The Permit Company, we help you obtain oversize and overweight…

The post Everything you need to know about securing an Arkansas oversized permit appeared first on The Permit Company.

Everything you need to know about securing an Arkansas oversized permit

M The Permit Company 2020 03 21

Arkansas is home to six national park sites, 2.5 million acres of national forests, seven national scenic byways, three state scenic byways and 50 state parks. But to drive an oversized load through The Natural State, you’ll need to secure an Arkansas oversized permit.

At The Permit Company, we help you obtain oversize and overweight truck permits by working directly with state and local agencies on your behalf. If you have any questions about moving oversized loads through Arkansas or securing a permit, we have the answers.

 

1. How long are oversize permits valid for in Arkansas? 

Oversize permits are valid for three days.

 

What are the legal dimensions for loads in Arkansas? 

The legal limits in Arkansas are as follows:

  • Gross weight: 80,000 lbs.*
  • Width: 8’6” on all roads
  • Height: 13’6” on all roads
  • Length: 45’ for single units and buses on all roads; 53’6” for semi-trailers on all roads, 28’ for twins and doubles on all roads (semi-trailers or trailers 28’6″ in length, that were in lawful use on or before December 1, 1982, are allowed); 65’ for autotransporters on all roads; 75’ for stinger steered on all roads; Rocky Mountain doubles, turnpike doubles and triples not allowed on any roads; and 90’ for saddle mounts (power unit and three saddle mounts) on all roads.

Federal Bridge Formula applies.

 

3. What are the permit limits for loads in Arkansas?

The routine-issue permit limits in Arkansas are as follows:

  • Weight
    • Steering axle: 12,000 lbs.
      • Single: 20,000 lbs.
      • Tandem: 34,000 lbs.
    • Load-carrying axle*:
      • Single: 20,000 lbs.
      • Tandem: 46,000 lbs.
      • Tridem: 60,000 lbs.
      • Quad: 68,000 lbs.

*No additional weight for trunnions.

  • Length: No set maximums
  • Width: 20’, 16’ on interstate system. A maximum overall width of 24′ may be allowed for short moves only in cases of an emergency.
  • Height: 17′. If the overall height exceeds 17′, the move must be accompanied by public utilities personnel.

If load exceeds any of these dimensions or weights, refer to the section on superloads.

 

4. Is continuous travel allowed for oversize permits in Arkansas?

Normally, permits are only valid during daylight hours as established by the U.S. Weather Bureau. Permits may be issued for the movement of overweight vehicles on Arkansas highways on holidays and during the night when all dimensions are legal. Loads not exceeding 90′ long may travel 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Loads that are only overweight may travel 24 hours a day.

Permits may be issued for movement of loads on Arkansas highways on Saturday and Sunday, unless it’s a holiday weekend. Mobile homes are prohibited from moving on Sundays.

Travel is restricted on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas Day.

 

5. When are escorts needed in Arkansas?

On two-lane highways:

  • 1 front escort is needed for widths 12’-14’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for widths more than 14’
  • 1 escort with height pole is needed for heights of 15’-16’
  • 1 escort with height pole (as stated on permit) and special approval is needed for heights more than 16’
  • 1 public utility escort is needed for heights more than 17’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) with height pole needed for vehicles more than 12’ wide and 13’6” high
  • 1 front escort is needed for lengths 100’-130’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for lengths 130’ or more

On four-lane or interstate highways:

  • 1 rear escort is needed for widths more than 14’
  • 1 front escort with height pole is needed for heights of 15’-16’
  • 1 escort with height pole (as stated on permit) and special approval is needed for heights more than 16’
  • 1 public utility escort is needed for heights more than 17’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) with height pole needed for vehicles more than 12’ wide and 15’ high
  • 1 rear escort is needed for lengths 100’-130’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for lengths 130’ or more

NOTE: The maximum width for highway movement is usually 20’ (based on routes, distance and traffic volume or type).

NOTE: Height poles should be run at 6” above load height on all highways.

Mobile homes

  • 1 escort is needed for widths up to 14’ on certain highways near the Little Rock area and on two-lane highways
  • No escorts are needed for widths up to 14’ on interstate or fully controlled access facilities.
  • 1 or 2 escorts are needed for widths more than 14’ depending on the route

 

6. What is a superload in Arkansas?

Any vehicles more than 16’6” wide, 100′ long, 15’6″ high or weighing more than 180,000 lbs. are considered superloads. Three copies of the applications for extra heavy load permits must be submitted along with a detailed sketch of vehicles including all tire sizes, the distance between axles and the overall length of the vehicle. If a load exceeds 17’ high, it must be escorted by public utilities personnel. This application should be submitted at least two days in advance of the expected move.

An additional $250 fee will be assessed on loads weighing more than 180,000 lbs.

 

If you need help in getting an oversize permit in Arkansas or have a question about permits in any other states, give us a call at (800) 359-9407 or send us an email.  

The post Everything you need to know about securing an Arkansas oversized permit appeared first on The Permit Company.

https://www.permitcompany.com/news/everything-you-need-to-know-about-securing-an-arkansas-oversized-permit/

Colorado trucking company to cease operations after 39 years, employees say

Family-owned H.H. Williams Trucking of Greeley, Colorado, told employees on Thursday it will close its doors by the end of January.

Colorado trucking company to cease operations after 39 years, employees say

Clarissa Hawes FreightWaves 2020 01 16

Family-owned H.H. Williams Trucking of Greeley, Colorado, told employees on Thursday it will close its doors by the end of January.

An employee of H.H. Williams told FreightWaves that one of the company’s owners, Howard Williams, told office personnel on Thursday that he and his wife, Cheryl, both in their 70s, have decided to retire.

“I think we were all surprised and stunned by the news,” the employee, who didn’t want to be named, told FreightWaves. “He gave no other explanation other than he is retiring and the company will start winding down business operations.”

Howard Williams did not respond to FreightWaves’ telephone calls seeking comment.

Rumors started swirling on social media on Wednesday that the company was closing its doors, but it was news to the small fleet’s employees and drivers until mid-morning Thursday, the employee said.

Since early Thursday morning, a dispatcher has been fielding phone calls from concerned brokers about the company’s possible closure. He will stay on until the end of the month to ensure all of the trucks are back in the yard. 

Other employees have not been given a date as to when their employment will end.

The 39-year-old company, known for its green and white Mack trucks, has 23 trucks and drivers, according to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s SAFER website.

“The owner told us that we still have trucks and equipment out on the road so it will take us until the end of the month to get everybody in and collect the keys,” the employee said.

The company had a dedicated account with Walmart for over 34 years, hauling drop and hook freight to stores in Colorado, Wyoming, the Dakotas and Montana, according to H.H. Williams’ website.

The website also stated that it had a reefer division with loads going to the West Coast and the Northwest.

This is a developing story.

Read more articles by FreightWaves’ Clarissa Hawes

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/colorado-trucking-company-to-cease-operations-after-39-years-employees-say

What is Total Cost Per Mile for truckload carriers?

Chris Henry runs fleet profitability benchmarking and analytics for FreightWaves and facilitates the TCA’s TPP program. If you are interested in benchmarking your fleet’s performance with the best operators, join TCA’s TPP. The data presented in this article come from analytics of over 230 truckload for-hire fleets, representing more than 70,000 trucks.  A wise trucker …

What is Total Cost Per Mile for truckload carriers?

Chris Henry FreightWaves 2020 01 13

Chris Henry runs fleet profitability benchmarking and analytics for FreightWaves and facilitates the TCA’s TPP program. If you are interested in benchmarking your fleet’s performance with the best operators, join TCA’s TPP.

The data presented in this article come from analytics of over 230 truckload for-hire fleets, representing more than 70,000 trucks. 

A wise trucker once said, “The only way to make money in trucking is to not spend it.” Truer words have never been spoken. This business is a game of razor-thin margins, and an infinite (and growing) number of risks and curveballs. This article is the first of two that will: 1) breakdown the cost components of operating a truck (and a trucking company); and 2) establish a financial framework for improved margins and bottom lines.

It’s very difficult for trucking companies to achieve higher than average rates per mile, per hour and per week. Due to low barriers to market entry, fleets and operators of all sizes are able to add capacity very easily to the market. As a result, shippers benefit from these hyper-competitive effects with rates that don’t typically capture the expense realities of trucking. 

Source: FreightWaves SONAR – NETREV.VCFOO, NETREV.RCFOO, NETREV.FCFOO

Total operating expenses in trucking (excluding very specialized operating models), range from extremes of $1.16 to $3.05 per mile when you simply take the best and worst from each of the categories below. Realistically, no trucking company could achieve an average total operating cost per total mile of $1.16, nor would they survive at $3.05 per mile. However, this article will illustrate the wide variances, and opportunity costs that operators realize on a day-to-day basis.

As the main pricing mechanism for trucking is the mile, it is important that industry participants understand their expenses relative to the miles generated by their trucks in a given week or month. Doing so provides an easier methodology to match  operating expenses with pricing decisions. 

Source: FreightWaves SONAR – MILTR.VCFOO, MILTR.RCFOO, MILTR.FCFOO

Total operating cost per mile summary table

According to the Truckload Carrier Association’s TPP fleet data (available to TPP members and SONAR subscribers), a for-hire truckload carrier will average between 1,700-1,900 miles per truck per week throughout the year, except for December. 

Average operating expenses for a carrier on a per mile basis: 

Expense Category Low Range High Range
Driver Compensation $0.48 per Mile $0.83 per Mile
Fuel  $0.40 per Mile $0.55 per Mile
Equipment Financing $0.00 per Mile $0.40 per Mile
Maintenance  $0.09 per Mile $0.40 per Mile
Insurance  $0.06 per Mile $0.18 per Mile
Variable Driving Expenses $0.01 per Mile $0.09 per Mile
Non-Driver Compensation $0.06 per Mile $0.30 per Mile
Fixed Overhead $0.06 per Mile $0.30 per Mile

Source: Truckload Carriers Association TPP Program for all carriers in the program. Data is available in SONAR. 

Driver compensation ($0.48-$0.83 per mile)

A disclaimer for independent contractors (ICs), driving labor does not equal ‘profit.’ The most successful ICs pay themselves a market wage in addition to projected profit. Whether the amount is actually ‘paid out’ as wages is another issue unique to the personal tax situation, and state/provincial residency of each IC.  Driving labor expense is the single largest expense for trucking companies. Depending on the geographic region, operating mode and length of haul, the combination of driving compensation, benefits and payroll taxes ranges from 28% to 50% of revenue. Industry averages for total driving labor expense per mile range from $0.49 to $0.83 ($0.67 per mile on average). This amount includes base wages, incentive compensation, per diem, accessorial pay, workers comp, health insurance and retirement benefits.

Recruiting and keeping drivers remains a difficult task for carriers, but several experts said that a strong social media approach improves both tasks. ( Photo: Jim Allen/FreightWaves )

Fuel ($0.40-$0.55 per mile)

Fuel represents the second-largest variable operating expense for any company or owner-operator. However, the difference between a top and bottom performer in trucking is directly correlated to the ‘net fuel expense’ calculation. Net fuel expense is simply the sum of gross fuel receipts, including taxes and additives minus fuel surcharge generated for the same time period. Top-performing trucking companies and ICs focus on some of these items and practices to reduce the gross fuel spend:

  1. Reducing speed and idle time, and maintaining proper shifting patterns
  2. Implementing fuel-saving technologies, equipment and practices (e.g. APUs, truck and trailer fairings, etc.)
  3. Reduce empty miles (unless it is more advantageous from a margin/yield perspective)
  4. Maximize ‘in network’ fuel spend. This one occurs when economies of scale really take hold, as fuel discounts are directly related to the volume of fuel purchased – the more fuel purchased, the lower the net fuel per gallon/litre.

Typically, gross fuel expense averages between $0.40-$0.55 per mile. However, when you factor in fuel surcharge and some or all the practices above, the net fuel spend can be dramatically less. Some trucking companies go further than most, utilizing financial instruments to ‘hedge’ their fuel expense from changes in the cost of diesel.

Trucks loading up on diesel. (Photo credit: Jim Allen/FreightWaves)

Equipment financing expense ($0.00-$0.40 per mile)

To be a trucker, you need a truck. Being mechanically inclined provides a distinct advantage for independent contractors and fleets alike. Being able to properly maintain equipment allows ICs and trucking companies to extend the average age of their trucks, and thereby reduce the large expense related to financing both trucks and trailers. In recent years, tax law changes have permitted accelerated capital equipment depreciation rates, meaning if a trucking company still owes money on its trucks and trailers, it is likely able to net more dollars after tax than before these changes. In recent years, fleets have reduced the average age of trucks to 2.3 years (on average). This trend is based on a growing school of thought that younger equipment reduces total tractor lifecycle expense (although this may be debatable based on original equipment manufacturer, specifications and operating conditions). In addition to traditional note financing, fleets and ICs alike have standard lease options available to them, along with Fair Market and Full-Service leases (the former taking care of the majority of maintenance expenses for a premium charge). As a percentage of revenue, due to the wide variety of financing strategies implemented by fleets and ICs, the cost of financing trucks and trailers ranges from 0%-30%.

Maintenance ($0.09-$0.40 per mile)

Based on my observations of over 200 trucking companies throughout North America, maintenance represents the largest margin opportunity for most companies. To be clear, maintenance expenses should capture all labor, parts, tires, supplies, oil, lube and fixed overhead (e.g. tools, shop rent, utilities, etc.). The difference between the top performers on maintenance and the bottom performers range from a low of $0.09 per mile to over $0.40 per mile! You read that right, that’s a $0.29 swing from top to bottom – think of the money going out the door! For many smaller fleets, especially those that do not use traditional accrual accounting, I suggest capturing the total maintenance spend over the past six months and keep rolling that average forward as each month unfolds. This reduces swings in large repairs from month to month and provides a clear picture of your maintenance expense.

Using VMRS codes can help fleets track down problems and reduce maintenance costs. (hoto credit: Shutterstock)

Insurance ($0.06-$0.18 per mile)

Insurance, for the purposes of this article and exercise, is the total cost of liability, physical damage and cargo insurance premiums and deductibles, plus the expense of any other accident-related damages. The latter item is one which sometimes gets ignored or is inappropriately categorized as a maintenance expense. In recent years the cost of insurance has been dramatically affected by the growing trend of nuclear verdicts in multiple jurisdictions and continued general accident repair expenses. This trend has led more companies and single truck operators to shoulder more of the burden of insurance themselves through higher deductibles and captive insurance arrangements. Increasing the deductible per incident (retention) also raises the risk of financial harm in the event of an accident. As such, a prudent operator should invest any insurance expense savings in practices and technologies to reduce the probability of accidents in the future, such as in-cab event recorders, collision mitigation tech and enhanced entry-level driver driving.

(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Variable driving expenses ($0.01-$0.09 per mile)

This category is the most nuanced of the expense categories, and the last of the ‘variable’ operating expenses. This group captures all the permits, tolls, fines, along with motels, lumper fees and driver orientation/screening and recruiting expenses (which can be significant depending on the size of operator/company). As such, it is a bit of a ‘catchall’ for those items that don’t fit cleanly into one of the other large buckets. Top performers keep an eye on the above items to ensure that they aren’t a symptom of inefficient dispatch (layovers), unsafe practices (fines), poor routing decisions (tolls) and bad culture (increased turnover).

Non-driver wages & benefits ($0.06-$0.30 per mile)

This is an area in which independent contractors have an advantage, as they handle all sales, administrative and operating activities themselves. However, they are very susceptible to spot market changes, and the reliance on brokers or load boards for freight. For those that seek to grow their fleet, you need to start hiring people for sales, dispatch, finance and safety roles. Depending on the operating mode (trailer type) and length of haul, a trucking company will have three to six drivers for every one non-driver. For smaller fleets, the expense of non-driving positions represents as much as 15% of revenue. As a company grows, and implements software and standard processes, the cost of non-driving activities can be reduced significantly (by 4-7% of revenue).

Fixed overhead ($0.06-$0.30 per mile)

The last of all operating expense categories is fixed overhead expense. This category will capture all rent, office supplies, software, utilities and communications expenses (among many other possible expenses). Generally speaking, from a percentage of revenue perspective, the cost associated with this category should closely approximate the cost of non-driver wages and benefits.

Truck drivers. (Photo credit: Shutterstock)

Summary

You cannot simply take the sum of the lowest values and highest values for each of the above categories to establish total operating expense per mile range for trucking. This industry has an endless number of modes and operating models, not to mention people and aptitudes. Being a top performer in one category doesn’t necessarily equate to top performance in multiple categories. However, understanding the numbers and their place in your margin equation can be the difference between survival and realizing the American (and Canadian) dream. 

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/understanding-total-operating-cost-per-mile

Grounded no more: The logistics of aircraft maintenance

The delay of aircraft components and replacement parts can mean tens of thousands of dollars in losses for airlines waiting to make necessary repairs, which is why so many turn to specialized logistics providers.

Grounded no more: The logistics of aircraft maintenance

Brian Straight FreightWaves 2019 12 10

Moving
aircraft from one location to another seems simple enough, but what if you have
six of them and have been contracted to relocate each without flying them, or
dismantling them for transport? And you have to do it safely and through a
Mideast country known for terrorist activity?

That is the situation staff members
of AIT Worldwide Logistics found themselves in a few years ago when a
U.S.-based industrial conglomerate hired the firm to transport six single-engine
aircraft from Afghanistan to Wichita, Kansas.

“That program that we executed from
Afghanistan to Wichita was one heck of an accomplishment,” Bob McGhee, director
of government and aerospace operations for AIT Worldwide Logistics, told FreightWaves. “We were ahead of schedule; we were under
budget; and we exceeded the customer’s expectations from day one.”

To complete the job, AIT tapped
into its network of providers, locating a Mideast-based service provider that
could secure an Antonov – the world’s largest cargo aircraft. With the airplane
secured, AIT moved to the routing portion of the job, with several options and
their associated risks, including political, climatological and security,
assessed and presented to the customer.

AIT Worldwide Logistics specializes in logistics for global businesses, including the airline industries. These moves can include everything from single components to entire aircraft, as this photo showed. AIT commissioned an Antonov, the world’s largest cargo aircraft, to transport six single-engine aircraft from Afghanistan to Wichita, Kansas, without dismantling the bodies of the plane. (Photo: AIT Worldwide Logistics)

“Multiple challenges conspired to
add complexity to the project with a high risk for skyrocketing costs,” AIT
explained. “The customer wanted to avoid dismantling the aircraft for shipping,
which left very few equipment options. Flying out of Afghanistan is inherently
dangerous, as is navigating the airspace in the region. Minimizing flyover
permits and royalties would prove to be tricky at best.”

The customer picked a safer route
that would be more expensive due to required royalties and flyover permits. AIT
said its negotiators worked with local officials and eliminated or minimized
certain costs to hold down expenses.

Every aspect of this move was
meticulously planned and involved daily conference calls, McGhee said. The
planes were loaded side by side into the Antonov and successfully delivered to
Wichita.

Relocating a plane is but one of
the services that specialized logistics providers fill for airlines and
industrial customers.

Expedited parts delivery service

While airlines can’t do much about
the weather that results in flight delays, they do have control over
maintenance. Maintenance delays, which lead to something called aircraft on
ground, or AOG, have a ripple effect throughout an airline’s network. Late
planes lead to unhappy customers, missed connections and planes out of position
for the next day’s flights.

According to Airspace Technologies,
a logistics firm specializing in the movement of aircraft parts, an AOG can
cost an airline up to $150,000 per hour. The National Center of Excellence for
Aviation Operations Research, in a 2010 study conducted jointly with the
Federal Aviation Administration, said that flight delays cost airlines $31
billion in 2007.

When an aircraft needs a part, the
logistics machine shifts into motion.

Airbus uses barges to transport large components such as this wing section on the Garonne River in France to Toulouse, where final assembly of planes is conducted. (Photo: Airbus)

“There are frequently planned
operations – that is the perfect world for us – but the
vast majority of our aerospace business, whether it’s military or commercial is
on an emergency basis, or in an AOG [situation],” McGhee explained.

AIT is a non-asset-based global
logistics business offering services in air cargo, sea freight, customs, ground
distribution, intermodal and warehouse management. Its aerospace logistics
business is staffed 24 hours a day, 365 days a year with certified
professionals whose job is to get aircraft parts, and sometimes entire
airplanes, to their destination quickly.

“It’s a very fast-paced market and it’s a very high-demand market for getting accurate information,” McGhee said. “We have a 30-minute window to honor all requests and a 90-minute window to [deliver] a transportation plan.”

All team members staffing its
“control tower” are military-certified so they can handle both civilian and
military requests. When an AOG happens, the AIT team moves into action. “There
is no canned response to these things,” Ken Jones, director of government and
aerospace sales for AIT, explained, as each move is unique.

The transport of intact aircraft engines can sometimes be done on in the cargo holds of commercial aircraft. But aircraft often can’t reach manufacturing facilities, requiring the use of trucks for final transport, as AIT Worldwide Logistics did with this Rolls-Royce Trent 800 engine. (Photo: AIT Worldwide Logistics)

How the replacement part is
transported depends on a lot of variables, including what it is, where it is
and where it is going. Some parts can move on commercial aircraft, while others
require a more specialized approach. Take an engine, for instance. According to
McGhee, some aircraft engines can fit in the cargo hold of a narrow-body
aircraft, making a commercial flight a possibility.

“It is very complex when you take
into consideration the size of the engine and the origin/destination plans,” he
said. “That is where the challenges are and where our subject matter expertise
comes into play.”

Customer-focused solutions

Because AIT services are “door to
door,” getting the part on an airplane is only half the battle. “There are
challenges when you have an airplane sitting in a secondary market that [larger
aircraft are] challenged to get into,” McGhee said. If a larger airport is
needed, then truck transportation becomes a requirement. “Having proper
partners … enables us to do that.”

Smaller aircraft parts are a bit easier,
and many actually fly on commercial aircraft. In some cases, they may fly on
UPS or FedEx cargo planes, but McGhee said the flexibility of commercial
aircraft is preferred.

“Nine times out of 10, we’re moving
that small part… on a commercial passenger airplane and the reason we’re doing
that is the scheduling is much more flexible,” he said.

Even when parts move on a UPS or
FedEx plane, AIT handles the “last mile,” preferring to maintain control of the
part to its final destination.

In some cases, a small part may
require a personalized approach. time:matters, a global spare parts logistics
business, told the story of a hand delivery in South Africa using its airmates technology
platform. In the case study, a PRIMUS Aero-managed aircraft was grounded in
South Africa, in need of a control unit.

“The missing control unit was in
the USA, however, not just around the corner from South Africa,” the company
noted. Booked through the airmates platform with the “On Board Courier” option,
the part was quickly located in Addison, Texas. A Texas-based courier picked up
the part and hopped a commercial aircraft to Atlanta and ultimately to Lanseria
International Airport in Johannesburg, South Africa, arriving with the part 25
hours after the first request arrived in the time:matters system.

Customs can delay spare part
delivery, although McGhee said AIT works with its local partners to ensure all
paperwork is filled out so delays are eliminated.

“There’s an extensive amount of
data out there that we have to juggle, but we work very closely on the U.S.
customs side [and destination countries to process this],” he said.

Jones added that AIT once had a
delay delivering a part because the grounded aircraft was sitting in a country
that had closed customs while it inaugurated a new king. Generally, though,
delays on the commercial side are minimal while military shipments can get hung
up due to political considerations – which countries’ parts can be flown over
or into, for instance.

The Airbus Beluga – technically an A300-600ST Super Transporter – is a customized aircraft designed by Airbus for its own supply chain. The Beluga is used to transport large aircraft parts to facilities throughout Europe. (Photo: Airbus)

Custom logistics networks

While companies such as AIT,
time:matters and Airspace Technologies provide customized services for
airlines, airplane manufacturers have developed their own networks. Airbus explained in detail on its website how it handles the movement of parts to final
assembly locations.

Utilizing five A300-600ST Super
Transporters nicknamed Beluga, Airbus Transport International moves complete
fuselage sections and wings from production plants throughout Europe to assembly
plants in Toulouse, France, and Hamburg, Germany.

In the case of parts for the A380
aircraft assembled in Toulouse, the Beluga – which are modified planes with
bulbous main deck cargo cabins – represents just one part of the journey.
Trucks and even watercraft are involved in the trip. Production sites
throughout France, Germany, Spain and the U.K. send completed sections of the
A380 to Bordeaux, France, where these large fuselage sections are loaded onto
waiting barges that travel the Garonne River to Toulouse.

Specialized equipment and training

When it comes to transporting
aircraft engines, the companies that handle these jobs have high standards.
International Machine Transport USA, with offices in Blaine, Washington, and
Dallas, Texas, has transported more than 12,000 engines throughout North America.
It requires all its drivers to attend classroom theory, complete field training
including the loading and securing of jet engines and pass a final exam with a
perfect score.

The company also handles helicopter
transport and more and works with a trailer designer to create custom trailers
for specific industries. Fitted tarps and protective padding are standard
elements to transport engines and other parts.

Skylink, which provides over 250,000 different line items for
distribution to airlines around the world, offers five “must dos” when moving
aircraft engines. They are:

1.       Secure the
engine on a quality engine stand

2.       Invest in
good tarps and tarp the engine multiple times

3.       Strap the engine
by the bottom of the engine stand

4.       When
traveling on a trailer, use an air ride trailer for a softer ride

5.       Work with a
trusted partner.

For airlines looking to minimize
AOG, companies like Airspace Technologies and AIT are the backbone of the
maintenance operation, but even those companies require help.

“We are a non-asset based
organization so everything we do is based on our relationships with our service
providers,” McGhee said. “We have very high standards [and global standards that
partners must meet]. The partners we work with have been developed with people
like myself and Ken and other leaders within AIT that have 30- and 40-plus
years of experience working with international partners and know who are the
most reliable to work with. There are companies that are very strong on
regional basis in various parts of the world that we have aligned ourselves
with and that have the same core values as we do.”

Even in the fast-paced world of
on-demand aircraft parts delivery, it still comes back to relationships.

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/grounded-no-more-the-logistics-of-aircraft-maintenance

FreightWaves creates free job board to help impacted Celadon employees (with video)

The sudden closure of Celadon has left thousands of lives impacted. To help those employees find work, FreightWaves has created a free job board where employees can post resumes and recruiters and fleets can post jobs.

FreightWaves creates free job board to help impacted Celadon employees (with video)

FreightWaves Staff FreightWaves 2019 12 10

In light of the Celadon shutdown, we have established a free
job board for companies to post jobs and for employees looking for employment
in the freight industry to post resumes. Celadon office employees are left
without health benefits and accrued PTO, making this holiday season more
stressful. There is no cost for anyone to participate.

Trucking and logistics employers – if you are looking for
employees with tribal knowledge of trucking, the pool of applicants coming from
Celadon is deep. 

The job and career board is focused on logistics talent,
ranging from freight brokerage professionals, customer service, load planners,
dispatchers, sales, recruiters, and drivers. The goal is to have a central spot
for recruiters, companies, and applicants to come together that doesn’t cost
anything to participate. 

“The tragedy of Celadon is impacting so many people across
the industry. FreightWaves is a part of driving transparency and connectedness
in the freight community and we wanted to expand that to connecting the great
talent with prospective employers. Families are being impacted by the sudden
closure of one of the trucking industry’s greatest franchises and the timing
around the holidays is even more unfortunate,” Craig Fuller, CEO of
FreightWaves stated. 

To search for logistics jobs, post new opportunities, or post a resume visit: FreightWaves.Careers.

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/freightwaves-creates-free-job-board-to-help-impacted-celadon-employees

Today’s Pickup: Safe parking available through TruckPark, Dock411 collaboration

Truck parking reservations are now available through popular facility rating app Dock411, plus, more on the Celadon closure, drone safety a focus of working group and Virginia considers a fuel tax hike.

Today’s Pickup: Safe parking available through TruckPark, Dock411 collaboration

Brian Straight 
FreightWaves 
2019 12 10

Good
day,

Truck parking reservation is now available through the Dock411 app thanks to an integration with TruckPark, the digital truck parking platform.

Users of Dock411 are now able to
reserve one of TruckPark’s thousands of available spaces through a link in the
Dock411 app. That link takes the user to TruckPark’s system, allowing drivers
to see and reserve available parking. Shippers will also be able to see the
location of these trucks through the Dock411 web portal, providing insight into
the vehicle’s location.

Spots can also be reserved through
the web portal.

“We have been excited since day one
about this partnership,” Anthony Petitte, CEO for TruckPark, said. “Dock411
helps us bring a full suite of tools to the industry. Shippers now can direct
drivers to safe and available parking and carriers rest easy knowing their
drivers and payloads won’t be compromised.”

Drivers have the option of choosing
locations based on preference and amenities, and security and yard features are
all visible to drivers that use the app, Petitte said.

Dock411 collects, curates and
shares facility profiles and reviews. A complete facility profile in Dock411
includes over 70 attributes, including local directions, restroom availability,
lumper fees, hazards and photos.

“We’ve worked hard to make Dock411
a great tool for the industry by listening to our users,” Eric Weidl,
co-founder of Dock411, said. “Drivers have told us again and again that finding
available parking is a daily challenge. Not only do they want more parking
locations, they want to be able to find those locations. We’re excited about
the opportunity to work with TruckPark to expose their parking locations to a
wider audience.”

Future plans include the ability
for drivers to reserve parking directly through the Dock411 app and to see the
number of available spots in real time, the companies said. Additionally, there
are plans to add more capacity around more shipper locations nationwide.

TruckPark provides technology that allows truck drivers to reserve a space in a lot operated by a partner company. Among those partners is Storemytruck.com, which joined the platform in September. That partnership will open over 10,000 parking spaces to truckers over the next few years.

Did you know?

Investors continue to flock to
supply chain technology businesses, with venture capital investment reaching
$11.7 billion for 371 deals in the first three quarters of 2019, according to
Pitchbook.

Quotable:

“We regret to inform everyone that
Celadon Group Inc. has filed for a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. We will continue to
haul and deliver all the loads that we now have in transit. We will have more
information in the morning as to where equipment needs to be returned to. We
have been assured that everyone who follows instructions will be paid for the
work and miles assigned and completed, and Celadon will not leave anyone
stranded away from home. Finally, we truly appreciate your commitment and
dedication to this company and wish you luck moving forward.”

— Celadon management, in a message Dec. 9 to its drivers on the company’s bankruptcy.

In other news:

Low-tax Virginia seeks hike in fuel tax

Virginia, which has the 12th-lowest state fuel tax in the country, is looking to raise that as it faces an infrastructure funding shortfall. (WTOP

Drone safety at heart of new working group

Police, fire and other stakeholders have joined forces to help study drone safety around major cities and urban centers. (Government Technology)

GM provides loan to new Lordstown owners

GM has confirmed that the new owners of its Lordstown facility were provided a $40 million loan to help facilitate the purchase. (Journal Gazette)

Rhode Island Trucking Association criticizes firm with large toll bill

The Rhode Island Trucking Association said a state trucking company that racked up $75,000 in unpaid tolls in Maine is not reflective of the safety-conscious image the industry considers important. (Go Local Prov)

Lost capacity from Celadon will be absorbed

The trucking industry will absorb the lost capacity from the Celadon closure, experts said. (The Wall Street Journal)

Final Thoughts

The sudden collapse of Celadon over
the weekend had one positive. Despite a perceived overcapacity in the market,
trucking companies up and down the spectrum reached out through social media
with offers of help and jobs. Surely, there was some self-interest involved,
but many companies were simply offering help in ensuring any stranded Celadon
drivers could get home to their families. Trucking may be a competitive
business, but in times of need, it is among the most compassionate.

Hammer down, everyone!

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/todays-pickup-safe-parking-available-through-truckpark-dock411-collaboration

Truckstop.com’s new platform benefits both carriers and brokerages

Chief Relationship Officer Brent Hutto explains the importance of embracing the freight industry’s digital evolution.

Truckstop.com’s new platform benefits both carriers and brokerages

Jack Glenn 
FreightWaves 
2019 12 09

With advances in technology and new entrants into the freight marketplace, Truckstop.com restructured to both navigate and help usher in the digital movement of freight.

Talking with FreightWaves CEO Craig Fuller on the FreightWavesTV show “Fuller Speed Ahead,” Truckstop.com Chief Relationship Officer Brent Hutto explained how a range of businesses can benefit from the company’s new digital freight-matching marketplace.

Truckstop.com markets itself as “the #1 load board for growing your business.” The company provides logistics solutions for transportation professionals, including load planning, transportation management, real-time rates and negotiation tools, as well as a credit reporting entity — the largest in the industry, according to Truckstop.com — that helps industry experts find trusted freight partners.

The “Nasdaq of Freight,” as Fuller described the company, recently celebrated the release of Book It Now. Available on the Truckstop Mobile app, Book It Now enables freight brokers and third-party logistics providers (3PLs) of all sizes to add instant load board functionality to their business, according to their website.

Carriers are able to see the rate, pickup and drop-off information, as well as broker information all before booking a load, according to Truckstop.com. Once carriers are added to a broker’s preferred carrier list, their Book It Now loads will be seen on the Truckstop Mobile.

While Truckstop.com celebrates its expanded offerings, Hutto explained that Truckstop.com has no desire to become a freight brokerage itself. Doing so would alienate 10,000 of its brokerage customers, according to Hutto.

Hutto explained that although many private marketplaces have created their own innovative technologies, this siloing of data hasn’t helped the overall market. Truckstop.com’s goal is to provide a platform that works for all players in the freight-matching marketplace, including brokerages and asset carriers alike.

“It’s always been our mantra as a company to help every business succeed no matter their size,” Hutto said. “We develop technology that allows them to be able to digitally match freight, to automate the things that need to be automated.”

Hutto said Truckstop.com wants to be the data connection in the middle of the marketplace where many parties can digitally connect and be able to move freight openly within the system.

But he explained that technology is only as useful as how well you leverage it and said that looking at industry data is probably the most important advice he has to grow your business. “You can adopt all the technology and buy all the data you want, but if you’re not building it into your business, then you’re not getting its advantages,” Hutto said.

More freight is handled by brokers than ever before, according to Hutto. Twenty years ago, only 4% of freight in the market was brokered. Today, that number has jumped to 25-30%. With more freight in brokerage than ever before, the ability to forecast market trends has never been more important.

And while market capacity has stayed relatively stable for the past 20 years, Hutto argued that many other factors remain variable in the marketplace. He believes fully utilizing Truckstop.com’s market-forecasting tools will protect businesses from the harsh effects market downturns can have on unsuspecting companies.

“If you can anticipate a downturn, you can adjust for it,” Hutto said. “If you don’t anticipate it, then the markets are going to be harder.”

Understanding how to integrate products into your business that can help create efficiency is what Hutto stressed that all in the marketplace should focus on.

“How are you going to adjust to this industry as it digitally changes?” Hutto said. “It’s going to change.”

https://www.freightwaves.com/news/truckstop-coms-new-platform-benefits-both-carriers-and-brokerages

6 Frequently Asked Questions About Oversize Permits in Kansas

“Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.” In 1939, Judy Garland uttered this line, which has become one of the most famous lines in cinematic history. But what happens when you are in Kansas, and you’re driving an oversized load? If you find yourself driving through Tornado Alley and need assistance with obtaining…

The post 6 Frequently Asked Questions About Oversize Permits in Kansas appeared first on The Permit Company.

“Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore.” In 1939, Judy Garland uttered this line, which has become one of the most famous lines in cinematic history. But what happens when you are in Kansas, and you’re driving an oversized load? If you find yourself driving through Tornado Alley and need assistance with obtaining an oversize permit in Kansas, The Permit Company is here to help.

 

The Permit Company takes the hassle out of obtaining oversize and overweight truck permits by working directly with state and local agencies on your behalf. Below is everything you need to know about moving oversized loads through the state of Kansas and how to obtain a permit.

 

1. How long are oversize permits valid for in Kansas?

Single-trip permits are good for one trip (seven travel days).

 

2. What are the legal dimensions for loads in Kansas?

The legal limits in Kansas are as follows:

  • Gross weight: 80,000 lbs. on designated interstate highways and 85,500 on all other roads*
  • Width: 8’6” on all roads
  • Height: 14’ on all roads
  • Length: 45’ for single units and buses on all roads; 59’6” for semi-trailers on all roads; 28’6” for twins and doubles on all roads; 75’ for autotransporters on all roads; 125’ for Rocky Mountain doubles, turnpike doubles and triples on all roads; 75’ for saddle mounts with a maximum of three units on all roads

*Bridge Formula applies.

 

Rocky Mountain doubles, turnpike doubles and triples are allowed on turnpikes of up to 125’ long.

 

The weight on any group of axles is limited by the Bridge Formula. Tandem axles with centers
less than 40” apart are counted as one axle.

 

3. What are the permit limits for loads in Kansas?

The routine-issue permit limits in Kansas are as follows:

  • Weight:
    • Single: 22,000
    • Tandem: 45,000
    • Tridem: 60,000
    • Quad: 65,000
  • Gross Weight*:
    • 5 axles: 95,000
    • 6 axles: 110,000
    • 7 axles: 150,000
    • 8 axles: 150,000
  • Length: 126′
  • Width: 16’6″
  • Height: Based on clearances; loads more than 17’ high must notify utility company

If the load exceeds any of these dimensions or weights, refer to the section on superloads. The maximum weight that the state allows you to register on your IRP cab card is 85,500 lbs.

 

Contact your IRP base state to increase your weight or to increase the weight on the permit weight space. The increase is valid for 72 hours.

 

4. Is continuous travel allowed for oversize permits in Kansas?

Continuous travel is allowed one half hour before sunrise to one half hour after sunset, seven days a week, 365 days a year. There are no movement restrictions on holidays.

 

There are no state restrictions for loads that are only overweight, but the Federal Bridge Formula applies.

 

5. When are escorts needed in Kansas?

On highways of less than four lanes:

  • One front and one rear escort (two in total) are needed for widths more than 14’. The rear escort may be eliminated if a warning light is attached to the top of the towing vehicle and to the rear of each load, and is mounted 2’–8’ above the surface of the road.

On all highways:

  • One front and one rear escort (two in total) are needed for mobile homes more than 12’6” wide. On four-lane highways, the mobile home needs an 8” amber flashing light attached to the top of the power unit and another to the top rear of the mobile home being towed.

  • One front and one rear escort (two in total) are needed for superloads with widths more than 16’6” or heights more than 18’. Qualifying superload vehicles include, but are not limited to, houses, barns, sheds, granaries and storage tanks.

  • One front and one rear escort (two in total) are needed for widths more than 14’ on the KS Turnpike.

Pilot car certifications are not required in Kansas.

 

6. What is a superload in Kansas?

Anything that exceeds the following requires a bridge analysis: 18’ high, 16’6” wide, 126’ long or 150,000 lbs. Call 785-271-3231 to schedule your analysis.

 

Applications for superloads must be submitted at least 10 days prior to the desired date of movement.

 

If you need help with getting an oversize permit in Kansas or have a question about permits in any other states, give us a call at (800) 359-9407 or send us an email.

The post 6 Frequently Asked Questions About Oversize Permits in Kansas appeared first on The Permit Company.

https://www.permitcompany.com/news/6-frequently-asked-questions-about-oversize-permits-in-kansas/

Everything You Need to Know About Driving Oversized Loads Through Utah

Not only is Utah home to five National Parks and several other National Monuments and Sites, but it’s also home to some transportation history. The world’s first transcontinental railroad was completed in Promontory where the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads met. To see this now National Historic Site while driving an oversized load through…

The post Everything You Need to Know About Driving Oversized Loads Through Utah appeared first on The Permit Company.

Not only is Utah home to five National Parks and several other National Monuments and Sites, but it’s also home to some transportation history. The world’s first transcontinental railroad was completed in Promontory where the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads met. To see this now National Historic Site while driving an oversized load through the state, you’ll need an oversize permit in Utah, which is where The Permit Company comes in.

 

The Permit Company takes the hassle out of obtaining oversize and overweight truck permits, working directly with state and local agencies on your behalf. Below is everything you need to know about moving oversized loads through the state of Utah and how to obtain a permit.

 

1. How long are oversize permits valid in Utah? 

Single trip permits are valid for four consecutive days or 96 hours.

 

2. What are the legal dimensions for loads in Utah?

The legal limits in Utah are as follows:

  • Gross Weight: 80,000 lbs. on all roads
  • Width: 8’6” on all roads
  • Height: 14’ on all roads
  • Length: 45’ for single units and buses on all roads; 53’ for semi-trailers on all roads; 61’ for both trailers of cargo and cargo carrying twins and doubles on designated highways and 81’ on all other roads; 75’ for autotransporters and stinger steered on all roads; 95’ combined trailer length for turnpike doubles, triples, and cargo and cargo carrying Rocky Mountain doubles on designated highways and 81’ for combined trailer length on all other roads; 75’ for saddlemounts on designated highways and 95’ for three-unit saddlemounts on all other roads.

Federal Bridge Formula applies.

 

3. What are the permit limits for loads in Utah?

The routine-issue permit limits in Utah are as follows:

  • Weight:
    • Single: 29,500
    • Tandem: 50,000
    • Tridem: Bridge Formula
    • Quad: Quads must be cleared through the Department of Transportation (DOT)
    • Trunnion: Bridge Formula applies
  • Gross Weight*:
    • 5 axles: 100,000
    • 6 axles: 136,750
    • 7 axles: 148,500
    • 8 axles: 186,750
  • Length: There is no maximum length. If the road can handle the length, then the permit will be issued. Loads more than 105′ in length need to be sent in for review**.
  • Width: Anything more than 14’6” requires review**.
  • Height: Anything more than 14’6” requires review**.

*These are just guidelines. The gross weight depends on your axle spacing and axle configurations. DOT will decide if these weights are permissible. Anything weighing more than 125,000 lbs. or the maximum allowed for a group, and the permit must go to bridge for analysis.

**Loads up to 14’6” wide, 14’6” high, 105’ long and with a gross weight of 125,000 lbs. or under should automatically be issued a permit.

If load exceeds any of these dimensions or weights, refer to the section on super loads.

 

4. Is continuous travel allowed for oversize permits in Utah?

Continuous travel is allowed one half-hour before sunrise to one half-hour after sunset seven days a week. You may travel 24 hours a day, seven days a week with loads 10′ wide (on all highways with proper lights and flags on all extremities), 105′ long and 14′ high. Loads 10’ to 12’ wide or 105’ in length may move on secondary highways at night with two certified pilot escorts. Loads 10’ to 14’ wide or exceeding 105’ in length may move at night with one certified pilot escort. Loads exceeding 14’ in height must have approval from UDOT.

Travel is prohibited for loads exceeding 10′ wide, 14′ high or 105′ long on New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Pioneer Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

 

5. When are escorts needed in Utah?

On all secondary highways:

  • 1 front escort needed for widths 12’-14’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for widths 14’-17’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort plus two police vehicles (4 total) needed for widths more than 17’
  • 1 rear escort needed for lengths 105’-120’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for lengths more than 120’
  • 1 front with height pole and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for heights 16’-17’6”
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort plus police vehicle (3 total) needed for heights more than 17’6”*
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for vehicles that cannot maintain the minimum posted speed
  • 1 front or rear escort needed for vehicles with an overhang of 20’ or more

On roads with four lanes or more:

  • 1 rear escort needed for widths 14’-16’
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for widths more than 16’
  • 1 rear escort needed for lengths 120’ or more
  • If the weight of the load is such that it cannot maintain the minimum safe speed (45 mph), an “Oversize Load” sign is needed. The sign should be 7′ x 18″ on a yellow background with black letters that are 10″ high in 1 5/8″ brush strokes.
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed for heights 16’-17’6”
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort plus police vehicle (3 total) needed for heights more than 17’6”*
  • 1 front and 1 rear escort (2 total) needed if the height keeps the vehicle from maintaining the minimum posted speed
  • 1 escort needed if overhang is more than 20’

*Must notify utility companies for heights more than 17’6”.

Utah escort certification has reciprocity with any state that has an accredited course and issues a certification card.

State programs accepted include: Ariz., Colo., Fla., Minn., N.C., Okla., Va. (issued after 1/1/2014 only for eight-hour training), and Wash.

Notes:

  1. Utah requires a written test and classroom training for escorts.
  2. Utah DOT may require escort vehicles at its discretion when sight distance is deficient or when the route requires it for safety reasons (i.e. – turning and twisting on canyon roads).
  3. Front escorts must use height pole more than 16′ high.
  4. State police will require 48-hour advance notice. Contact 801-965-4518 for assistance.

6. What is a super load in Utah?

Super loads are generally considered to be anything more than 17′ wide, 17’6″ high and 125,000 lbs. gross weight. The state considers any load requiring bridge analysis and special routing to be a super load. Diagrams of axle spacings and weights are required along with the routes you plan to travel.

Applications are usually processed within one day, but if it is an extremely large or heavy load, it may take up to 48 hours.

Loads in excess of 17′ wide, 17’6″ high or 175′ in length require police escorts. Some secondary routes require police escorts for smaller loads. For more information, check the secondary highway restrictions.

If you need help getting an oversize permit in Utah or have a question about permits in any other states, give us a call at (800) 359-9407or send us an email.  

The post Everything You Need to Know About Driving Oversized Loads Through Utah appeared first on The Permit Company.

https://www.permitcompany.com/news/everything-you-need-to-know-about-driving-oversized-loads-through-utah/